Stick or Lick: Can I Tape Business Letters instead of Licking Them?

Q: Is it poor etiquette to tape business letters rather than licking them?

A: Think of business stationery as a form of public relations. Whenever a piece of paper goes out, it should look good and suit the occasion because the appearance will reflect on the image and character of the business. A clean sealed envelope looks much more professional than one sealed with tape.

Irrational Implications: Dealing with Friends and Family That Make too Many Assumptions

Q: My husband and I work for the government in very stressful jobs. My in-laws are stuck in the cliche that working for the government is easy and imply frequently when we meet. I find it very offensive. Is there an appropriate way to broach this topic with them?’

A: Sure. Tell them that it hurts your feelings that they don’t take the time to understand that your jobs are challenging and stressful. Say, “May I tell you about just one week on the job so perhaps you understand?” If they brush off this effort, then continue to tell them, every time they comment, that they have upset you with their assumptions. And then change the subject. There is no need to be defensive or rude in return, just be matter-of-fact and move to a different topic.

 

I.D. Inquiry: How do I Answer the Office Phone When I know Who is Calling?

Q: How should an office phone equipped with caller I.D. be answered? Should we acknowledge the person directly and less formally if we know who is calling or should we stick to our normal formalities?

A: Answer as you would if you didn’t have Caller ID – John Jone’s Office. You have no way of knowing if it is really Sue, or someone using Sue’s phone, so it is best to be professional and let the caller identify him- or herself.

Fair Warning: How Early of a Notice Should I give Before Retiring?

Q: After working for a company for a life time how long a notice should be given before retiring?

A: It depends on how long a search might be needed to replace you. The minimum, of course, is two weeks. A month is thoughtful and helpful to the company, if they need to rethink and decide how to fill your position. You might give a month and then consider negotiating if they ask for more time and you are able to stay longer.