Overwhelming Offers : What to do when people bother you to buy things

Q. There is a new health store in the entrance hallway of the mall at which I am employed. Every single time I or anybody else walks by, there is an employee out front offering a free massage sample. On my way into work, I tell them I have to go to work, but they ask again as I leave. It’s annoying and I don’t think I should have to dread walking through the door for fear of being harassed. Parking at another entrance isn’t an option because of night closings and the outside doors being locked.

What can I tell them, or should I complain to mall management? It’s literally every single time.

A. Introduce yourself and explain to those employees that you work in the mall and really do not need a free massage sample. So since you will see them twice a day, you would prefer if they would not offer you samples. If they persist, discuss this problem with the health samples. If they persist, discuss this problem with the health store manager. If the situation doesn’t improve, report it to the mall management.

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Congradulations : How to announce a graduation but not ask for gifts

Q. I would like to send out college graduation announcement expressing that a gift is not necessary. how would you say ‘congratulations but no gift’ in the proper way?

A. A graduation announcement does not obligate the recipient to send you a gift – it is simply a great way to share your huge accomplishment and wonderful news. Some may send a gift, others will send a card, and still others will do nothing at all, but no recipient is required to send a gift.

Therefore, do not say ‘no gifts’ on your announcement. You may use the word of mouth method to let family and close friends know that you really do not want gifts. However, if you do receive them, accept them graciously and send a note in reply.

Open Thread

Welcome to the Etiquette Daily

This open thread is your space to use as you like. We invite you to discuss current and traditional etiquette. Feel free to ask questions of each other and the community moderators here.

Downsizing Dilemma : What to do when you have a small wedding

Q. I am 32 years old and engaged to be married. I have never ever wanted to have a large wedding. I have discussed it with my fiancee and he is supportive and sympathetic. I only want to invite a small number of people, close family and best friends on both sides, a maximum of 25 people.

However I have many friends and have attended many weddings over the years and I anticipate some negative response to my announcement that I will not be having a wedding, just a small ceremony. How do I handle this so that our friends realize that whilst their support and good wishes are very much appreciated, we are determined to keep our wedding small?

A. It is yours and your fiances choice on the size of your wedding. To uninvited friends, you can simply say you appreciate their good wishes but you have decided on a small wedding. No further explanation is needed.