Invitation Registration: How to write Housewarming Invitations

Q: Could you please advise on proper etiquette for house warming invitations regarding the registration of gift. Should gifts even be mentioned on invitation, if so should gifts be registered and mentioned?

A: The rules of a housewarming party are that it is held by the new homeowners (or renters) to welcome friends and family to their new home, to give tours and receive compliments, and to serve food and have friends help “warm” their residence with their caring and affection. Guests may or may not bring gifts.  Usually guests do, most often a bottle of wine, a plant, or a loaf of bread or other food item.  Housewarming gifts are usually small tokens, not major items: this is, after all, not a wedding. Mention of gifts is not made on the invitation and one does not register for gifts. A housewarming generally is held within three months or so of moving in.

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This open thread is your space to use as you like. We invite you to discuss current and traditional etiquette. Feel free to ask questions of each other and the community moderators here.

Life is a Revolving Door, But Who Goes First?

Q: My office is currently having a debate about this. When a man and a woman enter a revolving door, who enters first? Is there a reason for this?

A: Men traditionally enter a revolving door first, if it isn’t moving, but women enter first if it is already in motion.  This old bit of etiquette was based on the notion that women needed help to push the door.  Today the person in front enters first and pushes. The best idea is to signal your intentions: “After you,” or ” Let me get the door started for you.”

Open Thread

Welcome to the Etiquette Daily

This open thread is your space to use as you like. We invite you to discuss current and traditional etiquette. Feel free to ask questions of each other and the community moderators here.

Miss History: What are the Origins of the “Miss” Title?

Q: Can you tell me the origin of the title ‘Miss’ for an unmarried female?

A: Traditionally a woman’s social title was tied to her marital status. Young girls and unmarried woman were referred to as “Miss,” which is the shortened form of the archaic “Mistress.” The term ‘mistress’ was used to refer to both married and unmarried women until it was replaced by the abbreviation  ‘Mrs.’ for a married woman and ‘Miss’ for an unmarried woman or girl. The term ‘mistress’ was also used to refer to a woman who owned property or who was in a position of authority in a household.